Affectionately known as “Queen of the Missions,” Mission Santa Barbara was established in 1786 and is a National Historic Landmark.  The National Park Service provided a Save America’s Treasures grant including a match for a total of $1.3 million for various preservation projects.  Chattel was engaged to prioritize and manage implementation of grant projects.

Chattel prepared a Historic Structure Report (HSR) as a comprehensive guide to long-term preservation planning for the Mission and its convento wing.  The HSR provides relevant historical background and addresses feasibility of implementing grant projects.  For high-priority projects, Chattel prepares treatment plans and bid packages, collaborating with a cost estimator to ensure projects can be accomplished with available grant funds.  Chattel works closely with Mission leadership and the California Missions Foundation, as well as the California Office of Historic Preservation and National Park Service to ensure projects conform with the Secretary's Standards.

Chattel oversaw repairs to the corroded structural members of the crypt below the church floor.  

Chattel oversaw repairs to the corroded structural members of the crypt below the church floor.  

Work included reconstruction of the solstice window on the 1820 church facade. 

Work included reconstruction of the solstice window on the 1820 church facade. 

Ongoing work includes repairs to sandstone walls of the convento wing at the Mission.  Deterioration is caused by an impermeable Portland cement render, which traps moisture in the underlying materials. Similarly, the impermeable tile floor prohibits water from evaporating. Thus, moisture escapes where it can, which in this case is at the sandstone door and window surrounds.   

Ongoing work includes repairs to sandstone walls of the convento wing at the Mission.  Deterioration is caused by an impermeable Portland cement render, which traps moisture in the underlying materials. Similarly, the impermeable tile floor prohibits water from evaporating. Thus, moisture escapes where it can, which in this case is at the sandstone door and window surrounds.