Environmental Review

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Compton City Hall

In 2009, the City of Compton received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to replace windows at City Hall to improve energy efficiency. Chattel first determined the building was a historic resource and then helped the City of Compton navigate the Section 106 process by consulting closely with a glazing replacement contractor, California State Historic Preservation Office, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Chattel worked with the city to find a method of window replacement that would not alter the character defining features of this modern building from the recent past. After exploring a number of glazing alternatives, the project team selected a low-e coated glass that could be installed in the old window frames, making the change almost imperceptible.

The project won a Los Angeles Conservancy Preservation Award in May 2013.


NEON MUSEUM

Chattel served as consulting historic preservation architect on rehabilitation of the 1961 La Concha Motel lobby during its transformation into the visitor center for the Neon Museum in downtown Las Vegas. Designed by renowned African-American architect Paul Revere Williams, the La Concha Motel's lobby featured a thin shell roof with three parabolic arches that contribute to the diversity of William’s portfolio and serve as a rare extant example of the Googie style in Las Vegas.

The lobby was carefully cut into eight pieces and moved to its current site at the Neon Museum where it was reassembled. Chattel collaborated with Westar Architectural Group/Nevada, Inc. on rehabilitation of the lobby and design of a compatible addition of offices and museum support spaces. The lobby now serves as an entry point for the Neon Musem's outdoor exhibition space, the Neon Boneyard, which includes more than 150 un-restored vintage signs from iconic Las Vegas properties including the Moulin Rouge, Desert Inn, Flamingo, and Stardust Hotels, and, of course, the La Concha Motel itself.


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san juan capistrano substation

The Classical Revival style substation was constructed by Southern California Edison (SCE) in 1918 and later sold to San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) in 1928. The building is a T-shaped, reinforced concrete substation that housed a “frequency-converter” that helped convert and distribute electricity from SCE to SDG&E customers.

SDG&E initially thought to demolish the substation as part of a larger system-wide improvement project and hired Chattel to author a Preservation Alternative to determine if the historic building could be incorporated into the proposed project. Working with NV5 engineers, Chattel provided guidance on design that was sensitive to the historic resources on the property, yet allowed for the client to build the necessary equipment. Ultimately, the Preservation Alternative called for the demolition of the utilitarian and less visible East Wing of the substation.

With the successful integration of the Preservation Alternative into the Environmental Impact Report, Chattel was again retained to provide construction monitoring and prepare a Historic American Engineering Report, which was accepted into the Library of Congress in February 2018.


Compton City Hall

In 2009, the City of Compton received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to replace windows at City Hall to improve energy efficiency. Chattel first determined the building was a historic resource and then helped the City of Compton navigate the Section 106 process by consulting closely with a glazing replacement contractor, California State Historic Preservation Office, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Chattel worked with the city to find a method of window replacement that would not alter the character defining features of this modern building from the recent past. After exploring a number of glazing alternatives, the project team selected a low-e coated glass that could be installed in the old window frames, making the change almost imperceptible.

The project won a Los Angeles Conservancy Preservation Award in May 2013.


Neon Museum

Chattel served as consulting historic preservation architect on rehabilitation of the 1961 La Concha Motel lobby during its transformation into the visitor center for the Neon Museum in downtown Las Vegas. Designed by renowned African-American architect Paul Revere Williams, the La Concha Motel's lobby featured a thin shell roof with three parabolic arches that contribute to the diversity of William’s portfolio and serve as a rare extant example of the Googie style in Las Vegas.

The lobby was carefully cut into eight pieces and moved to its current site at the Neon Museum where it was reassembled. Chattel collaborated with Westar Architectural Group/Nevada, Inc. on rehabilitation of the lobby and design of a compatible addition of offices and museum support spaces. The lobby now serves as an entry point for the Neon Musem's outdoor exhibition space, the Neon Boneyard, which includes more than 150 un-restored vintage signs from iconic Las Vegas properties including the Moulin Rouge, Desert Inn, Flamingo, and Stardust Hotels, and, of course, the La Concha Motel itself.